In this time-lapse video, taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, bunny-suited engineers move the Mars 2020 rover into a large vacuum chamber for testing in Mars-like environmental conditions. For more info about the mission, visit mars.nasa.gov/mars2020

Video credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech youtube.com/watch?v=7SFh4TZRXH

Highlights of the November sky include how to watch as Mercury transits the Sun on Nov. 11, plus how to observe the regular dimming and brightening of the "Demon star," Algol, with your own eyes. Additional information, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at go.nasa.gov/34hp376 . Algol animation is licensed as CC-BY-SA 3.0. Video credit NASA-JPL/Caltech. youtube.com/watch?v=4mSETiiOpe

Original Air Date: Oct. 17, 2019

All the material we can see is just a small fraction of the universe. The rest, a full 95 percent, is invisible and mysterious. These are the enigmatic dark matter and dark energy. While dark matter keeps things like galaxies together, dark energy acts in an opposite way – it pushes groups of galaxies apart and expands the universe itself. This event will discuss how astronomers are working to map the universe’s dark matter so they can see the effects of dark energy. The results could help us understand if the universe will expand at an accelerating rate forever.

Host:
Preston Dyches

Speaker(s):
Alina Kiessling — Astrophysicist, NASA-JPL
Jason Rhodes — Astrophysicist, NASA-JPL youtube.com/watch?v=DWtrkeSX9d

NASA’s InSight lander on Mars is trying to use its robotic arm to get the mission’s heat flow probe, or mole, digging again. InSight team engineer Ashitey Trebbi-Ollennu, based at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, explains what has been attempted and the game plan for the coming weeks. The next tactic they'll try will be "pinning" the mole against the hole it's in.

The German Aerospace Center (DLR) built the mole. It is designed to dig under the Martian surface to measure heat flowing out of the planet. Scientists want this data to learn how Mars and other rocky planets form.

For more about the mission, visit: nasa.gov/insight and mars.nasa.gov/insight/ youtube.com/watch?v=uuJoyZ0IuL

What can you see in the October sky? Join the global celebration of International Observe the Moon Night on Oct. 5th, then try to catch the ice giant planets Uranus and Neptune, which are well placed for viewing in the late-night sky.

Additional information about topics covered in this episode of What's Up, along with still images from the video, and the video transcript, are available at go.nasa.gov/2olXlGD youtube.com/watch?v=TnbAVSmpmy

NASA's InSight lander placed a seismometer on the Martian surface to study marsquakes. While it's found many, it has also detected other kinds of seismic signals, including some produced by the spacecraft itself. That includes wind gusts, InSight's robotic arm moving around and "dinks and donks," friction caused by parts inside the seismometer moving against each other as the temperature changes.

Put on your headphones and you can hear sonifications of this seismic "noise" recorded on March 6, 2019, the 98th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Around 2 p.m. local Mars time, the spacecraft's arm was moving and snapping pictures with its cameras, surveying InSight’s “workspace.”

This audio would be too faint for the human ear to heart it on Mars. It's been sped up by 10 times and processed so you can hear the kinds of signals InSight sends back for its scientists to study. youtube.com/watch?v=m9cCuW9nIQ

Original air date: Sept. 19, 2019

There are no service stations in space. Join Dr. Marc Rayman for the story of how NASA repaired and saved a spacecraft millions of miles away.

Speaker: Marc Rayman,
Mission Director/Chief Engineer/Project Manager for Deep Space 1

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Some of the smallest and lightest rockets in NASA’s lineup have made some of the biggest impacts on science. With a flight time of just about 15 minutes before falling back to Earth, sounding rockets collect unique observations on everything from our planet’s atmosphere to the Sun and even distant galaxies.

Join us live to hear from scientists who have traveled to the ends of the Earth to launch sounding rockets, flown cutting-edge instruments on these suborbital flights, and used sounding rockets to make brand-new scientific discoveries. youtube.com/watch?v=KkeCXrgrKu

Astronauts Andrew Morgan of NASA and Luca Parmitano of the European Space Agency (ESA) will venture outside the International Space Station starting at ~7:05 a.m. EST to begin repairing the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) instrument. This is the first in a series of repair spacewalks - the most complex of this kind since the servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope. AMS is attached to the outside of the space station, where it has been operating since 2011. It is a particle physics experiment working to help us understand dark matter and the origins of the universe. youtube.com/watch?v=evaBhht5uG

A critical milestone for commercial crew, resupply spacecraft delivers to the space station, and a new wide-eyed view of the southern sky … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!

This video is available for download from NASA's Image and Video Library: images.nasa.gov/details-NHQ_20 youtube.com/watch?v=emQej1NKTt

Karen Moore shares her story on how her 2018 internship at NASA's Langley Research Center allowed her to support the Minority University Research and Education Project for American Indian and Alaskan Native STEM Engagement (MAIANSE). The NASA Office of Education's MAIANSE initiative supports tribal colleges or universities with career development and internship opportunities.

Learn more about MAIANSE by visiting nasa.gov/education/maianse. youtube.com/watch?v=yfvrAq21Gc

As the planet warms, fire seasons burn year-round and more areas are becoming flammable. are studying how fires are changing with the climate, and tracking how landscapes change after fires. With satellite data, people on the ground and partners with communities and agencies around the planet, are helping prepare for the “new normal” of fires on Earth. youtube.com/watch?v=NR1c_4VWx9

NASA’s Lunar Scientist Sarah Noble answers questions about the Moon and our plans to send humans there with the Artemis program, as we prepare for eventual trips to Mars.

Comment with your question and subscribe to learn more from our experts!

This video is available for download from NASA's Image and Video Library: images.nasa.gov/details-NHQ_20 youtube.com/watch?v=jTvP1VhGh8

TESTING 1...2...3🚀 Boeing put its ’s launch abort system to the test on Monday, Nov. 4 at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, lifting off at 9:15 a.m. EST. The test demonstrated the spacecraft’s ability to protect Commercial Crew Program astronauts by carrying them safely away from the launch pad in the unlikely event of an emergency prior to liftoff. youtube.com/watch?v=1NLQ4bO-f5

Important cargo headed to the space station, installing the thrust behind our return to the Moon, and a devastating wildfire seen from space … a few of the stories to tell you about – This Week at NASA!

This video is available for download from NASA's Image and Video Library: images.nasa.gov/details-NHQ_20 youtube.com/watch?v=4nspRYAso0

On Sat., Nov. 2 at 9:59 a.m. EDT, Northrop Grumman's Antares rocket and Cygnus spacecraft launched from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station. Cygnus will deliver around 8,200 pounds of research, supplies, and hardware to the orbiting laboratory, including supplies for upcoming spacewalks and student CubeSats.

Read more about the mission: nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-sc youtube.com/watch?v=yWZKQ73aGr

Where does Earth's atmosphere end and space begin? This and other questions soon will be answered by NASA’s Ionospheric Connection Explorer, or ICON, satellite. Get ready to watch as the Pegasus countdown reaches T-Zero from its carrier aircraft flying near the Kennedy Space Center.

Learn more about this mission that launched on Oct. 10, 2019: nasa.gov/icon youtube.com/watch?v=UgLNbGl9-i

A new image of the Tycho supernova remnant from Chanda shows a pattern of bright clumps and fainter holes in the X-ray data. nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra

There’s an adage that it’s not healthy to skip meals. Apparently, a supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy millions of light years away has gotten the message. nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra

NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has captured many spectacular images of cosmic phenomena over its two decades of operations, but perhaps its most iconic is the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra

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